Waterfall Archives | North Photo
Hindhope Linn in Kielder Forest

Hinhope Linn and Kielder Forest

Hindope Linn, situated on the eastern fringes of Kielder Forest, is a firm favourite of mine. A nice waterfall in its own right, it's the surrounding forest and the nearby Blakehope Burn that really make it what it is. So on a day off work, with a bit of fog forecast, it seemed the perfect destination for a walk and a few photos.

The Fog

Hindhope Linn sits a short walk away from Forest Drive just off the A68. On the way up there, the fog was rather dense so I stopped up near Kirkharle for a look around. Sitting in the middle of a nearby field was an excellent, and quite eerie looking, lone tree shrouded by the fog.

Definitely worth further investigation, I hopped over the barbed wire fence (don't tell the farmer) and set up for a few shots. This was the result:

Fog-shrouded lone tree
Fog-shrouded lone tree

Glad I stopped - but unfortunately I slipped when climbing back over the barbed wire fence... two puncture wounds and three cuts to my hand and thigh later... it was worth it though!

Hindhope Linn Trail

If you've never been to Hindhope Linn before it's quite easy to find. Head north up the A68 towards the border - in between Rochester and Byrness you'll see the left turn onto Forest Drive into Kielder Forest. Take this road and as soon as you cross the small bridge there's parking on the left next to a public toilet block. Park here then head up the track past the farm and keep an eye open for the well-signposted path to Hindhope Linn on the right. Simply follow the track (and the orange arrows) and you're there. There are a couple of maps further down this post if you need them.

This is one of the nicest stretches of the trail:

Hindhope Linn Trail
The Hindhope Linn Trail

A little further on the path forks. Take the right-hand fork and you'll descend to a small bridge from which you can see Hindhope Linn, upstream from a smaller cascade by the bridge.

Hindhope Burn
Hinhope Burn with Hindhope Linn in the distance

Walking upstream leads you directly to Hindhope Linn, a pretty waterfall nestled in amongst the forest undergrowth. It's easy to cross the burn if you wish to have a nosy around, otherwise it's a dead end as there's no easy way up the sides.

Hindhope Linn
Hindhope Linn

Blakehope Burn

Heading back down to the small footbridge, the main river is the Blakehope Burn which is well worth exploring in its own right. Meandering and cascading off to the east, there are swirling pools and beaches full of shiny pebbles set in gorgeous forest surroundings.

Blakehope Burn
Blakehope Burn

You can continue to follow the path along the burn before it diverts up a curling set of steps into the forest, eventually joining the Hindhope Burn upstream from the waterfall. I'd highly recommend taking the time out to explore further while you're there.

Hindhope Linn Trail
The path alongside Blakehope Burn

Location

As mentioned above, it's easy to find Hindhope Linn. But in case you're not familiar with the area, here are a couple of maps to show the location:

Hindhope Linn Map

I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on Hindhope Linn (by the way, I'm never sure if the 'Hind' in Hindhope should be pronounced to rhyme with 'binned' or 'bind' - any ideas?) and Kielder Forest - please leave your comments below.

Thanks for reading, and feel free to check out my other posts and photos. You may enjoy my posts about 7 stunning North East waterfalls and 7 of the best photo spots in Northumberland.

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Druid’s Temple, Nidd Falls and Harmby Falls

Druids Temple, Nidd Falls and Harmby Falls

A little while ago I came across this excellent photo of Druid's Temple in North Yorkshire. I'd never heard of it before and it instantly sparked my curiosity. After a little research it was firmly marked on my list of places to visit. I got my chance on a day's holiday from work to pop down and explore, and also managed to get a couple of waterfalls in: Nidd Falls near Lofthouse and Harmby falls in Harmby, near Leyburn.

Druid's Temple

Druid's Temple was first up for the day. After an arduous journey down from Northumberland (a closed road lead to a fair amount of traffic...), we arrived at the car park which is just a few minutes' walk from the Temple. It's a really impressive sight, as you can see...

Druid's Temple
Druid's Temple, North Yorkshire

A bit about the Temple: it's important to note that this is a folly, built somewhere in the late 1700s and early 1800s (no one seems quite sure precisely who built it or when). It's understood that it was built as a copy of a Druid's temple (hence the name...) and was constructed to give locals paid work. Apparently someone was offered a salary to live there as a hermit for seven years!

 

As well as dozens of standing stones and an altar, there is a cave and stone table to the rear, which you don't see until you're nearly at the rear of the temple, as the altar blocks it from sight.

Druid's Temple Cave
The stone table and cave at Druid's Temple

The surrounding woods, known as Druid's Plantation, offered up a few photo opportunities too. There was a thin layer of mist hanging for the duration of my visit, which added to the atmosphere and the photos. There are excellent views of Leighton Reservior from the edge of the forest, although the conditions didn't allow for a decent photo.

Druid's Plantation
Druid's Plantation
Druid's Plantation
Druid's Plantation, with in-camera movement

Nidd Falls

Next up on the list was a waterfall near Lofthouse, not marked on the Ordnance Survey map but known locally as Nidd Falls. Thanks to the excellent blog My Yorkshire Dales for the inspiration and directions. If you haven't come across this before, it's a great read if you're looking for locations in the Yorkshire area.

Following the given directions, we parked up by the Fire Station and walked up the road. Sure enough, it was remarkably easy to spot the waterfall from the road, so we headed down and  explored the area.

Nidd Falls
Nidd Falls, near Lofthouse
Nidd Falls

Harmby Falls

Our final destination for the day was Harmby falls, this time inspired by Yorkshire Waterfalls, another useful blog detailing dozens of waterfalls in the Yorkshire counties. We parked up at the roadside and followed the rather helpful 'Waterfall' sign down some steps almost straight to the waterfall. There's a small footbridge across the stream so it's easy to explore what is an impressive waterfall from both sides.

Harmby Falls
Harmby Falls, with the footbridge in view
Harmby Waterfall

Thanks for reading, and if you liked this you may find my post about the top waterfalls in the North East of interest...

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Wild Camping: Glen Etive and Glencoe

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7 stunning North East waterfalls

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Gordale Scar in the Yorkshire Dales

Gordale Scar   On Friday I took a trip down into the Yorkshire Dales. Malham Cove and Gordale Scar have been on my to-do list for some time, but I just never seemed to get round to going. A couple of friends had been down recently so this reignited my desire to visit (thanks Joz […]

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Amble North Pier

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